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Finding Freedom

Living Forgiven and Free

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March 2018

Guest Post: Patient Voices Matter

I’m grateful the National ALS Association gave me a platform to be heard.

The Official Blog of The ALS Association

This guest post is from Shelly Hoover, EdD, a member of the Patient & Caregiver Advisory Committee, and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Association staff, its Board of Trustees, or its chapters.

By guest blogger Shelly Hoover

Patient voices matter, yet the collective ALS patient community has been too patient and too quiet for too long.

The ALS Association led an unprecedented effort to develop an FDA Guidance Document for Industry. Here’s a quote from the introduction:

“In February of 2015, The ALS Association launched this effort to develop the first-ever community-driven drug development guidance for ALS with funding from the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, bringing together over 100 participants including people living with ALS, caregivers, researchers, clinicians, and industry experts from across the world to contribute their expertise and experience. In parallel with this effort, a committee was formed to update the ALS clinical trial…

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Blessed Are Those Who Mourn

I’ve never known such pain as that of my broken heart, a physical presentation of indescribable grief.

My ALS journey, a treatise on grief, started with the loss of cute shoes, then my career and mobility. Sometimes I threw things in frustration, followed by the snot-faced ugly cry. You know, the cry that mocks your Kleenex.

I adjusted, adapted, accepted, and returned to gratitude. I found a new normal with the help of family and friends.

My arms and hands betrayed me next. Goodbye driving, feeding myself, and giving hugs.

So, I adjust and adapt. Technology helps. Yet, I haven’t found my new normal.

I’m in the throes of grieving and the tears show up uninvited. I keep the grief hidden until it forces its way to the surface, like a foreign body that needs to come out. There’s no stopping it and it hurts like hell.

I mourn the everyday use of my hands, but I’ll adjust to someone else bathing and feeding me. I use my eyes to type and text, hands free. What I’m having difficulty losing, that no one and no technology can replace, are the simple pleasures of teaching my grandchildren. I’d dreamed of being like my grandmas. One taught me to crochet, and I picked cucumbers with the other. We baked and shopped, read and played games. Above all, I felt their love.

With my grandchildren, I want to play silly duets on the piano. I want to make sandcastles on the beach, cookies in my kitchen, and strings of popcorn and cranberries for the Christmas tree. I want to play hide and seek and tickle their tummies when I find them. I want to hug them and put Band-aids on their knees. I have to accept the fact that I never will.

What I fear the most is being a disengaged grandma that isn’t able to show my grandkids how much they are loved and adored. I fear missing out. I’m profoundly sad and know I have to grieve before I can move past this.

I share my pain and struggles in this public forum because I promised to be authentic and transparent on my journey. I know it’s hard for you to read this. Please don’t feel sorry for me. Compassion is welcome, pity is not.

So, what now? Have you lost someone or something important? Allow yourself to grieve, it’s part of the healing process. Do you have a friend going through a difficult time? Come alongside and sit with him or her through the silence and tears. Don’t say or do anything to fix it. Just be there.

My tears will stop. My family and I will find a different way for me to stay engaged. I have no doubt. I will adjust and adapt. Eventually, I will accept it.

I’m Forgiven and Free and on the road to gratitude.

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