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Finding Freedom

Living Forgiven and Free

Month

December 2016

Unmet Expectations

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Much of my emotional suffering is a result of unmet expectations. 

The visible suffering of ALS is obvious in loss of ability to control my body. Sure it’s frustrating for me and everyone who loves me. So we slow down, add equipment, change routines, adapt and adjust.

We all have expectations, beliefs that something is likely to happen.

Get out of bed.
Walk to the kitchen.
Pour a cup of coffee.

Most able-bodied people wake every morning knowing these things will happen. It’s expected. Even though I can visualize myself doing these simple tasks, I have no expectation that they are going to happen without assistance. Acceptance lessens suffering.

Having unreasonable expectations is a great source of suffering.

The key to limiting suffering? Reframe expectations of myself and others. Let me explain. I suffered a great deal the past six months because of what was happening politically in the U.S. I was physically and emotionally sick. I quit writing, I changed political parties, I quit my Bible study, I unfollowed friends on FaceBook and was unfollowed and unfriended by a great deal more. I spiraled. I was horrified at the thought of a greedy, narcissistic, degrading, mocking, lying bully being elected President and didn’t want to be around anyone or any organization who did. I expected others to view the election as I did, to see what I saw, and to value what I valued. Didn’t happen. My expectations, what I believed was likely to happen, didn’t happen. I suffered for it. Bigly.

I was wrong for placing my expectations on others.

I’ve thought through the angst I caused myself and have reframed my expectations. Am I happy and accepting of the election results? Unequivocally no. But I have removed the unreasonable expectation that others view the world as I do. I’m channeling my energy to promote issues of social justice and compassion. A much better choice than suffering.

Here’s another example: I expect my family and friends to read my mind, to know what I’m thinking, and to know what I need from them. Nonsensical. When I find myself suffering because of what someone else is doing or not doing, I have to stop and ask: Do I have a reasonable expectation? Have I communicated my need? If the answer is no, I am causing my own suffering.

Does this practice eliminate all of my emotional pain? No. The feelings are real and I have to find a way to process them. However, I do have a sense of controlling how long and to what depth I experience the pain. I’m able to roll away from it when I’m done.

What can we reasonably expect from others?

I’m not suggesting we all walk away from relationships and disengage from society. But I am suggesting that we carefully examine the judgement and expectations we place on others. What can I reasonably expect? I expect to be treated with care and respect and will reciprocate in kind. However, I have no expectation that you will be able to read my mind or think or act the way I expect you too. If someone doesn’t treat me with care and respect, I can choose to not be in relationship with him or her. If that’s not an option, I can emotionally disengage. 

Are you the cause of your own suffering?

What are you expecting from people or society that is causing you to suffer? We have no right to expect justice or deference. Really, we don’t. So take a step towards eliminating your own suffering and finding freedom by reframing your expectations.

I’m Forgiven and Free and reframing my expectations.

 

My Shrinking World

Some is my own doing; some is a consequence of declining mobility and function. But no doubt, my world is shrinking. My constant go, go, go has been reduced to a single go and rest the remainder of the day. Friendships have diminished; some have extinguished.

Much of my time is consumed with medical appointments, researching and trying out the technology that is slowly replacing my own functionality. This week it’s a bed that rotates my entire body from left to right. Ahhh. I’m so excited at the thought of being able to move again in bed! An able-bodied person moves every 11 minutes during sleep. I move a total of zero times if unaided by a rotating bed or tired husband.

Eye-gaze and speech to text technology will soon replace my failing hands. It’s a good news bad news thing. The bad news is my hands are failing, the good news is there is technology available to replace clicking and typing with my hands. Thanks VA Healthcare for providing all the technology I need without putting up much of a fight.

ALS can be physically isolating. I miss full-on hugs. They’ve been replaced by awkward side arm hugs from my power chair. I miss easily visiting a friend’s house. Steps and door thresholds are not friendly to me. Sure ramps can typically get me in the door, but then there are those pesky rugs and tight corners. I would hate to take a chunk out of your drywall.

ALS can be socially isolating as well. Eating is now a difficult and messy proposition and many social interactions revolve around food and drink. I’m sure I’ll get used to the stares and mess. But for now it’s still embarrassing.  I’m transitioning from a social butterfly extrovert to a peaceful introvert. I’m growing more comfortable with extended periods alone with my thoughts. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It is what it is.

Is my shrinking world a function of age? Disability? Wisdom? Isolation? Self-pity? I’m not sure. Oh wow. This is sounding like a pity party that needs to end. Let’s focus on gratitude. I’ve got a lot to look forward to and even more for which to be thankful.

I hope to be participating in the next arm of the GDC-0134 phase I clinical trial slated for January. If all goes as planned, I will be taking the new drug every day for two months. Hope is exciting stuff.

I’m Forgiven and Free

Ode to Opposable Thumbs

You separated me from most of the animal kingdom, my opposable thumbs.

Open a shampoo bottle
Pick up a fork
Pull up the covers

Turn the page
Text a friend
Mute the TV

You are slipping away from me.

Squeeze the toothpaste
Put in earbuds
Unlock the car

So clumsy. Atrophy is winning.

Shuffle the cards
Twist a Q-Tip
Write a note

Impossible.

Oh wonderful opposable thumbs, how I miss you.

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